University of Sydney Vietnam Institute launches in Vietnam

The University of Sydney Vietnam Institute will be a hub of innovative research from public health to sustainability, ranging from leading the fight against tuberculosis to Vietnam’s future in engineering and agriculture. The institute launches with ceremonies in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi.

The University of Sydney Vietnam Institute has been officially launched and will build on a network of leading researchers and educators to benefit communities in Vietnam and beyond through impactful research and engagement. From a strong foundation of health and human clinical trials, the Institute will be the site of multidisciplinary research in health, agriculture, arts, social sciences, business, and Net Zero initiatives.

Australian researchers will work alongside Vietnamese collaborators and the community on projects such as supporting public health efforts and combating tuberculosis in Vietnam, developing emerging technologies for breast cancer diagnosis in the country and examining Vietnam’s future as a media innovation hub.

One of the Vietnam Institute’s goals is to improve in-country scientific capacity and contribute to the region’s economic and social development.

The Institute is supported by up to 40-45 million (AUD) in non-profit funding from the Australian government and international donors. All revenue generated by the Institute will be reinvested into research activities in Vietnam.

The University of Sydney is extremely proud to launch the Institute, which honours our commitment to research and engagement in Vietnam. It builds on a long history of collaboration with Vietnamese researchers, students, government and industry.

Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Mark Scott

Researchers from Vietnam and Australia attended a research symposium as part of the Institute’s official launch. Credit: University of Sydney.

The launch is being celebrated with ceremonies, attended by senior government, diplomatic, research, medical and university leadership from Vietnam and Australia, held in both Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi, where offices have been established. There is also an office in Can Tho.

The opening events include the Sydney Vietnam Innovation Symposium, bringing together Australian and Vietnamese university leaders, researchers, and scholars.

Vice-Chancellor and President of the University of Sydney, Professor Mark Scott AO said:

“The University of Sydney is extremely proud to launch the Institute, which honours our commitment to research and engagement in Vietnam. It builds on a long history of collaboration with Vietnamese researchers, students, government and industry.

“As our flagship research initiative in Vietnam it will support current and future leaders and be a hub for advanced research and innovative ideas, continuing to deepen the engagement between the University and Vietnam.”

The University of Sydney and Vietnam share the same research and development goals, including working to improve quality of life and achieve sustainable development goals.

Professor Thu-Anh Nguyen, Executive Director and Head of Research said:

“We look forward to collaborating with domestic and international organisations and individuals to build a robust platform that enhances multidisciplinary research capacity and improves quality of life for local and global communities.”

Current research partnerships between University of Sydney researchers and Institute staff include:

  • Multiple projects led by Professor Greg Fox, related to the treatment, management and prevention of tuberculosis in Vietnam and the region by working with hospitals, universities and government health agencies.
  • Understanding drivers of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Vietnam. This will involve researchers from the Sydney Vietnam Institute working with partners from the Woolcock Institute and the Vietnam Ministry of Health, UNICEF and Murdoch Children’s Research Institute.
  • The Sustainability through Creativity project, which connects communities to museums to create solutions to sustainability challenges through art and design projects, led by Associate Professor Jane Gavan who visited Southern Vietnam for this project.
  • Establishing a new ‘One Health’ pathology lab at Hue University, involving Institute staff working alongside University of Sydney researchers.

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